The “EARL BLAIK COACHES AWARD” is named after the 1915 Steele High School Graduate Earl “Red” Blaik.  He served as the Head Football Coach at Dartmouth College and the United States Military Academy (West Point) for 18 seasons.  While at West Point he coached 35 First Team All-Americans and his teams were named National Champions in 1944 and 1945.  Three of his players Doc Blanchard, Glenn Davis and Pete Dawkins all won the Heisman Trophy as the nation’s outstanding collegiate player.

“2019 AWARD RECIPIENTS”

DON MITCHELL

BOYS TRACK/CROSS COUNTRY COACH

ROOSEVELT HIGH SCHOOL

2019 AWARD RECIPIENT

Coach Mitchell started his coaching career under school’s legendary coach Floyd (Dude) Norman and was an assistant coach on the 1961 State Championship Team.  He coached cross country at Dayton Roosevelt from 1958 through 1974 and at Dayton Roth from 1975 through 1978. He took over the head coaching position at Roosevelt in 1969 and in that same year coached his first individual state champion in Olden Wallace (who won the 100 meters and finished second in both the 120 high and the 100 low hurdles).  He won his first state championship in 1971 with his team led by All-American Jeff Parks who won three events in the state (the high and low hurdles as well as the long jump.  Roosevelt finished second in the state meet in 1972).  In his career, he won two Ohio High School State Track Championships, nine Dayton City League Track & Field Titles and five District Championships.  He also won five Cross County Dayton City League Titles and one District Championship. 

GEORGE KELLAR

FOOTBALL COACH

MEADOWDALE HIGH SCHOOL

2019 AWARD RECIPIENT

Coach Keller put together consecutive 10-0 seasons in 1976 and 1977.  It was the first back-to-back perfect 10-0 seasons every recorded in Dayton City League History.  Coach Kellar played on the Colonel White 1960 undefeated (10-0) team under Coach Jim Eby.  He retired from coaching to go into business, having achieved a 51-16-1 career record in seven seasons.  George graduated from Colonel White High School in 1964 and Otterbein College.  He began his teaching and coaching career at Meadowdale High School.  He loved that job and had the opportunity to mentor so many students and develop life-long friendships with them.  After teaching he worked at Shopsmith and ended his working career at Pierre Frozen Foods.  George continued to live a full life in retirement by being involved in the Montgomery County College Scholarship program as a mentor and through service in his church. 

RON SUMLIN

BOYS BASKETBALL COACH

FAIRVIEW HIGH SCHOOL

2019 AWARD RECIPIENT

 

Coach Sumlin led the Fairview Boys Basketball Team to the school’s fifth Dayton City League Title. The highlight of the season was knocking off Roth, who went on to win the State Class AA Championship that season.  The other four league titles were captured in 1938, 1941, 1943 and 1976.  This team was led e team was led by Mark Dempsey, Alvin Hall.

BOB STOVER

FOOTBALL COACH

KISER HIGH SCHOOL

2019 AWARD RECIPIENT

Coach Bob Stover led Kiser to seven Football City Championship Titles in the 1940s.  He later went on to become the principal at the school.   His 1946 team included four outstanding standouts who all made the All-City team: Roy Hortman, Russ Johnson, Joe Horvath and Ron Brookey.  Brookey, who lettered in four years in three sports, later became the first football and a very successful long-time baseball coach at Meadowdale High School

 

LARRY SHADOWENS  

BOYS BASKETBALL COACH

WILBUR WRIGHT HIGH SCHOOL

2019 AWARD RECIPIENT

 

Larry Shadowens began coaching at Wilbur Wright in 1973-74 after leaving Stivers before its closing in 1975.  While at Wilbur Wight he was known for his coaching philosophy which emphasized fundamentals, team play and sportsmanship.  His 1979 Team, was led by Dayton City League Player of the Year Eric Bradley and future University of Dayton Hall of Famer Sedric Toney, captured the Ohio Southwest Ohio Class AAA Sectional Championship by defeating Lebanon (59-46).  Several of his former players who went on to play at the collegiate and professional levels have become very successful coaches and executives in both the Dayton City League and other leagues around the country.  His coaching legacy has had more of an impact on the Dayton City League than any other coach in the last 50 years.  His City League Coaching tree includes Mike Violette (Patterson), Carlos Roberts (Colonel White/Stivers/Ponitz), Eric Bradley (Patterson/Stivers) and Felix Turner (Meadowdale/Stivers).  Others that entered the coaching profession are Eric Ely (Oregon State) and Ike Thornton. Jr. (Sam Houston HS/Smithson Valley HS) in San Antonio Texas.  Larry was inducted into the Stivers Athletic Hall of Fame in 2009.  While a student at Stivers High School, Larry earned 3 letters in both basketball and cross country.  He received “Special Mention, All-City” two years.  He played one year at Wilmington College, then while attending the University of Dayton, served as head basketball coach at Shawn Acres Children’s Facility in 1960 and 1961.

MIKE HALEY, SR.

BOYS BASKETBALL COACH

ROTH HIGH SCHOOL

2019 AWARD RECIPIENT

Mike Haley began his coaching career at Roth High School after the closing of Roosevelt High School in the Spring of 1975.  The decision to close Roosevelt created chaos in coaching assignments and resulted in Coach Haley taking over the Roth program at the beginning of the 1975-76 school year.  After two successful seasons at Roosevelt and winning his first Dayton City League Championship the year of the closing many of his players followed him over to Roth.  One of those players was a Sophomore named Dwight Anderson, who was later named National High School Player of the Year in 1978.  While at Roth, Coach Haley captured three Dayton City League Titles (1977, 1979 & 1981) and three Ohio High Athletic Association State Championships (1976, 1981 & 1982).  After capturing the state championship crown in 1976, he became the first Ohioan to play on and coach a Boys Basketball State Championship Team.  Haley’s coaching philosophy centered on a run-and-gun fast break style which called for bench depth and he often ran 10 or 11 men in and out the game (concept being to wear down the opposition).  Coach Haley won his first State Championship in the Class AA Division in 1976, after edging Lorain Catholic 82-81.  Roth would win their second state championship in 1981 after going (19-1) during the regular season and moving up to the Class AAA Division.  They defeated Newark in the championship game by a score of 83-81.  This win propelled Coach Haley into a class of his own making him the first coach ever to win state basketball titles in two different divisions.  Roth dropped back down to Class AA because of the declining enrollment the next season.  But the Falcons were still playing mostly a Class AAA schedule and went 24-4.  They would go on to defeat Youngstown Rayen 68-56 in the Championship Game.  This win would put him in a class of only a few coaches ever to win back-to-back championships and three state titles.  Later that spring, the Dayton Board of Education decided to close Roth at the end of the 1982 school year.  The surprised decision once again created a coaching and player shuffle.  Coach Haley would move over to Dunbar the next season.  Mike grew up in Portsmouth down on the Ohio River and attended Portsmouth High School.  He led his high school to the Ohio High School Class AA State Championship in 1961.  He accepted a basketball scholarship to Ohio University where he played for Coach Jim Snyder.  While there, he helped lead the Bobcats to two Mid-American Conference Championships and the school’s first appearance in the NCAA Tournament.  In the 1964 tournament, he played a major role in the upset victory over the Kentucky Wildcats and advancing to the Elite 8 where they lost to the University of Michigan. 

JOHN ROSS

BOYS BASKETBALL COACH

BELMONT HIGH SCHOOL

2019 AWARD RECIPIENT

 

Coach Ross was a Pioneer in developing a premier high school basketball program.  When Belmont High School opened in 1956, he was promoted from an elementary coaching position to be an assistant basketball coach under R.C. (Skip) LaRue.  Ross became head coach in 1961 and won two city championships while leading Belmont High School to the 1964 Ohio State Basketball Championship.  That championship team had six players advance to play major college basketball.  He was also named the Ohio High School Coach of the Year in 1964.  Discipline was the key to Ross’ theories.  John Ross is credited with starting the WSU men’s basketball team in 1969, and served as the team’s first head coach.  Starting the program from scratch with a junior varsity team in 1969-70, WSU started a full varsity status team in 1970-71 and posted a 65-54 record during Ross’ five-year stint as head coach.  Ross stepped down from coaching after the 1974-75 season and assumed assistant athletics director duties under Director of Athletics Don Mohr until his retirement in 1980.  He then served as an assistant with head coach Ralph Underhill in the mid-1980s.  Ross also started the baseball program at WSU in 1971 and served as head coach that year.  He was selected as a member of the Wright State’s second Hall of Fame class in 1986 and his Belmont team was inducted into the Ohio Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013.  Coach Ross is also a member of the Wilmington College Athletic Hall of Fame.  A native of Nevada City, CA, he moved to Ohio at a young age and graduated from Mason High School where he played basketball and baseball.  Following graduation, Ross was drafted in the Navy where he served three years in Pacific as a Radio Operator.  Upon his return, he attended Wilmington College to complete his Bachelor of Arts degree in Education in 1949 and coached several sports at Bellbrook and Cedarville High Schools.  In the late 1950’s and early 1960’s, Ross landed teaching and coaching positions with Dayton City Schools.  He received his Master of Education in physical education in 1966 and scouted for several colleges until his appointment at WSU. 

STANGLAWS SLATER

FOOTBALL/BASKETBALL/TRACK COACH

DUNBAR HIGH SCHOOL

2019 AWARD RECIPIENT

In 1933, Frederic C. MacFarlane, Dunbar’s first principal, designated Stanglaws Slater as head of the physical education department and head coach of all three sports (football, basketball and track).  Upon his appointment, Coach Slater selected the Wolverines as the school’s mascot and chose the original colors of maize and blue in honor of his alma mater the University of Michigan.  In the beginning, there was no athletic competition with white high schools either in or out of Dayton for the school and at the time athletes of that era wore hand-me-down uniforms and traveled hundreds of miles to get to games, using any means of transportation available.  Games were played against segregated schools in Covington (Kentucky), Louisville, Evansville (Indiana), Cleveland, Cincinnati and Indianapolis (Indiana).  On October 14, 1933, Dunbar made its football debut playing Lincoln-Grant (another all-Negro team) from Covington, KY.  Coach Slater is a native of Grafton, West Virginia.  He attended high school in Mishawaka, Indiana and played football, basketball and track there.  In both his junior and senior seasons, he was selected to the All-City Teams in football and basketball.  After high school he was recruited by Knute Rockne from Notre Dame, but chose Wilberforce University instead with the encouragement of his pastor.  While at Wilberforce he was a three-year letterman in football, basketball and track, earning 11 letters and All-American Tackle honors from Grantland Rice.  He also was a member of the Varsity “W” Club and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the R.O.T.C.  He Earned his B.S. Degree from Wilberforce in 1928.  Shortly after graduating, he enrolled at the University of Michigan to study medicine.  Due to ineligibility for football, basketball and track, he joined the boxing team and became the Michigan heavyweight champion and team captain.  In addition, he also won the state amateur and Golden Gloves Heavyweight Titles.  He often served as sparring partner for Joe Louis, Jack Dempsey and Tommy Loughran.  In 1931, he ran out of money for school due to the depression and had to move to Philadelphia to play for the Peerless Five (semi-professional basketball team and the Philadelphia Colored Giants (the professional team in Philadelphia at the time making $90 per week (peak salary at the time).  He re-enrolled at the University of Michigan in 1932 and changed his major from pre-medicine to education.  Also, in 1932 he won the Jack Dempsey Award for being the outstanding heavyweight and earned a place on the 1932 U.S. Boxing Team.  He graduated from the University of Michigan in 1933 with a A.B. Degree.  He resigned his position at Dunbar High School in early 1940 to work as an Assistant Director at Linden Community Center under the Federal Government Civil Service Department.  Later that same year, he was named Director for the Center, while also working in the personnel department of Hobart Welder in Troy OH.  Dunbar was not admitted into the Dayton City League until 1947. 

HARRY WILHELM

FOOTBALL/BOYS BASKETBALL COACH

STIVERS HIGH SCHOOL

2019 AWARD RECIPIENT

Harry Wilhelm was a member of the Stivers Football team that won the State Championship in 1919.  After graduating from Stivers he went on to attend the University of Illinois.  While at Illinois he had the opportunity to coach the late great Red Grange, while serving as a student assistant coach for two seasons.  Red later recalled Harry, saying that he was a great student of the game and a great coach.  In 1924 he returned to Stivers to become both the Head Football and Basketball Coach.  He coached at Stivers High from 1924 until 1926.  In an article by Marc Katz, he was described as a hell and high-water coach. Harry Wilhelm was coaching both football and basketball when the Tigers won their 5th state basketball title.  In 1924 the team lost the City Championship to Steele High but went on to become the State Champs – beating the Ravens from Youngstown. Ohio 15-14.  A few months later his football team went 10-0-1 and claimed a National Championship. He served as the head football coach at Denison University in Granville, Ohio for one season, in 1927, compiling a record of 3-5.  Prior to that, Wilhelm served as an assistant coach for the Dayton Triangles of the National Football League (NFL) in 1925.

 

 

TOM CLEMENTS

BASKETBALL COACH

COLONEL WHITE HIGH SCHOOL

2019 AWARD RECIPIENT

 

A lifelong Dayton resident, Coach “Clem” grew up on the West side during the 1940’s and 50’s. As the 9th of 15 children, he learned early on that hard work, humility, and determination were requirements for success.  His interest in athletics and thirst for competition began in high school as a member of the Chaminade football team.  As the only minority, Tom was the first African American ever to earn a varsity letter in the program. Despite the odds and a crowded city league weighted heavily against him, his talent and commitment earned him All-City honors as a running back in 1959.  He went on to be a two-way player for Kent State, and led the Golden Flashes in rushing in 1964.  Tom’s teaching and coaching career in Dayton started at Roosevelt in 1968.  Over the course of the next 30 years he was the head or assistant coach for a variety of men’s and women’s sports including football, basketball, track & field, baseball, softball, tennis, and even chess.  As an assistant basketball coach for Mike Haley, Tom was part of the 1976 Roth State Title team, as well as the 1987 Dunbar State Title team.  With multiple City titles and other notable coaching achievements well in hand, the punctuation mark of Tom’s coaching career came in 1990 when he led the talented, high-powered, “runnin’, slammin’” Cougars of Colonel White to the Division II Boys State Basketball title.  His love for coaching and loyalty to the kids of the Dayton Public School system resulted in the rarest of high school sports trifecta’s – 3 State Championships/3 different schools/3 different decades.  As a father of 6 and an esteemed father-figure for many troubled and disadvantaged students, Tom was even known to open his home as a safe place of refuge, love, and support.  He earned a Master of Science in Education from the University of Dayton in 1988, and after a fulfilling and decorated career as an Art Teacher, Coach, and Athletic Director, Tom retired from the Dayton Public School system in 1997.

 

 

CRAIG WALLACE

BOYS TRACK/CROSS COUNTRY COACH

PATTERSON COOPERATIVE HIGH SCHOOL

2019 AWARD RECIPIENT

 

Coach Craig Wallace sprinted and jumped for Dayton Dunbar High School and Kentucky State University.  In his high school career, he won four gold medals in the state high school track meet, including three as a senior leading Dunbar to the school’s second Ohio High School State Track & Field Championship.  He tied the world record for the indoor 60 yard and 70-yard dashes while at Kentucky State and tied the state high school record in the 220 as a senior.  He also scored at the indoor NCAA Indoor Meet in the 60-meter dash.  He coached track at Dayton Roth in 1972, at Dayton Stivers in 1973 & 1974, and at Dayton Patterson from 1975 to 1999.  He coached boys cross country at Patterson from 1974 to the present and girls cross country from 1978 to the present.  His coaching career includes two high school state track championships, nine city league titles and four district/regional track championships.  He also won six boys conference cross country titles and one girl cross country District Title. Served as OAT&CCC Ohio coach for Midwest Meet of Champions.  Coach Wallace is a proud member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity.